[786] Immunohistochemical Expression of Radixin and Moesin in Prostatic Adenocarcinoma

TL Bartholow, AV Parwani. University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA

Background: Many members of the Protein 4.1 superfamily have been proposed to be involved in cell adhesion. Some are also believed to be involved in cell proliferation and growth, or in the regulation of these processes. While the expression levels of two members of this family, radixin and moesin, have been studied in many tumor types, to our knowledge they have not been investigated in prostate cancer.
Design: Tissue microarrays were immunohistochemically stained for either radixin or moesin, with the staining intensities subsequently quantified and analyzed. There were 11 cases of normal donor prostates, 14 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), 23 cases of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), 87 cases of prostatic adenocarcinoma, and 24 cases of normal tissue adjacent to adenocarcinoma compared in the radixin-stained tissue microarrays. There were 11 cases of normal donor prostates, 12 cases of BPH, 23 cases of PIN, 88 cases of prostatic adenocarcinoma, and 25 cases of normal tissue adjacent to adenocarcinoma compared in the moesin-stained tissue microarrays.
Results: Normal prostatic tissue, BPH, and PIN had higher absolute staining scores for radixin than prostatic adenocarcinoma and normal tissue adjacent to prostatic adenocarcinoma, with a significant difference observed between only PIN and prostatic adenocarcinoma (p = < 0.001) and PIN and normal tissue adjacent to prostatic adenocarcinoma (p = 0.001). In the moesin-stained specimens, prostatic adenocarcinoma, normal tissue adjacent to adenocarcinoma, PIN, and BPH all received absolute higher staining scores than normal donor tissue, but the differences were not significant. Stage 4 moesin-stained prostatic adenocarcinomas had a significantly reduced staining intensity compared to Stage 2 (p = 0.003).
Conclusions: To our knowledge, these studies represent one of the first reports on the expression profiles of radixin and moesin, which have been shown to play important roles in cell adhesion. The current study has shown that there were stastically significant differences observed between PIN and prostatic adenocarcinoma in terms of radixin expression. Similar trends were noted in moesin expression profiles but the differences were not stastically significant. Overall, these findings have important implications for prostate cancer neoplastic progression. Additional larger studies with these markers and related cell adhesion markers such as the Ezrin–radixin–moesin-binding phosphoprotein 50 may further elucidate their potential roles in prostatic neoplasia progression.
Category: Genitourinary (including renal tumors)

Wednesday, March 24, 2010 9:30 AM

Poster Session V # 105, Wednesday Morning

 

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