[OR23-5] Fructose Compared to Glucose Ingestion Preferentially Activates Brain Reward Regions in Response to High-Calorie Food Cues in Young, Obese Hispanic Females

Kathleen Alanna Page, Shan Luo, Ana Romero, Tanja Adam, Houchun Harry Hu, John Monterosso. University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA; University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA; University of Southern California/Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.

Increases in dietary fructose consumption parallel the rising rates in obesity. Animal data show that the central administration of glucose reduces food intake, whereas fructose administration promotes food intake. We tested the hypothesis that fructose compared to glucose ingestion would result in greater hypothalamic and brain reward center activation and increased hunger and desire for food in response to high-calorie (HC) food cues in young, obese Hispanic females, a population at high risk for continued weight gain.
A 3-Tesla scanner was used to perform functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on 13 young (23±2 years), obese (34±4 kg/m2) Hispanic females. Participants underwent 2 fMRI sessions together with ingestion of either fructose or glucose (50g in 150 mL water) in a double blinded, random-order crossover design. Scanning was performed as subjects viewed images of HC and low-calorie foods and non-food (NF) items using a block design. After each block participants rated hunger and desire for sweet and savory foods. Total scan time was ∼30 min. Drinks were ingested after 15 min of baseline scanning. Brain activation to HC foods was determined by calculating a contrast of HC minus NF images. Effects of fructose vs. glucose ingestion on brain signal change to HC food cues was examined by comparing the contrast maps after fructose vs. glucose ingestion. Ratings of hunger and desire for food during HC vs. NF blocks were compared with paired t-tests.
Independent of sugar ingestion, viewing HC food images activated the hypothalamus, striatum, insula and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) (Z>2.3, p<0.05,corrected) and increased hunger (t(1,12)=5.317,p=0.0001) and desire for sweet (t(1,12)=2.942,p=0.012) and savory foods (t(1,12)=4.221,p=0.001). Hunger (t(1,12)=4.441, p=0.001) and desire for savory foods (t(1, 12)=2.735,p=0.018) were greater after drink ingestion regardless of type of sugar. Whole-brain analysis suggested that fructose compared to glucose ingestion produced greater activation in the nucleus accumbens and OFC, brain regions involved in reward processing, in response to HC food cues (Z>1.6,uncorrected).These data suggest that viewing HC food images activates brain reward regions and increases hunger and desire for sweet and savory foods, and that fructose compared to glucose ingestion preferentially activates brain reward regions in young, obese Hispanic women. These neural and behavioral responses could promote food intake and weight gain.

Sources of Research Support: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities P60 MD002254-01 Pilot Project awarded to KAP; NIDDK 1K23DK092702-01 awarded to KAP.

Nothing to Disclose: KAP, SL, AR, TA, HHH, JM

Date: Monday, June 25, 2012
Session Info: ORAL SESSION: Mechanisms Linking Peripheral Metabolism to Central Regulation of Appetite (11:15 AM-12:45 PM)
Presentation Time: 12:15 pm
Room: 351

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